About your Search

20121101
20121130
SHOW
( more )
STATION
MSNBCW 43
MSNBC 42
CSPAN 24
FOXNEWS 21
CNNW 20
CSPAN2 18
KGO (ABC) 18
CNN 16
WHUT (Howard University Television) 14
KQED (PBS) 13
WMAR (ABC) 8
WETA 7
WJLA (ABC) 7
WUSA (CBS) 7
( more )
LANGUAGE
English 333
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 333 (some duplicates have been removed)
's carriage accident and his return to washington, the famous state in which lincoln walks through richmond and then he returns to washington. the first thing lincoln does is go straight for the train station to see his friends who were in bed and seward wakes up and the two of them talk a while. seward cannot set up. in order to converse more comfortably, lincoln gets into bed with him, leaning on his elbow, and the two of them shot for an hour. >> how do we know? >> frederick's memoire, the son, and fannie seward, the daughter, kept a wonderful diary. >> he is 64. how old are his sons, augustus, frederick, and fannie? >> fannie is 19. augustus is late 20's. frederick, early 20's. >> they are young. what was the assassin's name? >> alternative names. lewis powell. late 20's. not more than that. a confederate veteran. a big man. 6 feet, 3 inches. it would have been army patrols immediately after the assassination. armed guards are around after, but no, no one protecting the secretary of state. some scholars think booth realized in the event of the debt of both the president and the vice pre
to change washington solely from the inside. that is what the president has always believed, that we need the american people to keep pushing on washington and their leaders. you just cannot transfer this. people are not going to spend hours away from their families and their jobs contributing financially when it is are for them to do it unless they believe in the candidate. all of this, the door knocks, the contributions made, the phone calls made, or because these people believed in barack obama. for candidates who want to try and build a grass-roots campaign, it's not going to happen because there is a list are because you have the best technology. they have to build up the kind of emotional appeal so people are willing to go out there and spend their time and resources and provide their talents because they believe in someone and what they are offering. we are hopeful that many people that helped us this time will end up running for office themselves, are leading nonprofit, or playing enormously valuable roles in their community. again, i think the only reason all this happened on the
with breaking news out of washington. "the washington post" is reporting tonight that president obama is considering massachusetts senator john kerry as his new secretary of defense. that's right, defense. putting the decorated veteran and former presidential candidate in charge at the pentagon and not at the state department, as had been widely speculated. "the washington post" is sourcing its reporting to unnamed senior administration officials. senator kerry is also not commenting tonight. if senator kerry does move to the cabinet for defense or any other post, there will be an immediate political question for the democrats as to what happens to his u.s. senate seat in massachusetts. senator kerry had mostly been talked about as a potential replacement for secretary of state hillary clinton. the post reporting tonight that that nomination for secretary of state is instead almost certain to go to united nations ambassador susan rice. republicans tried to make into a scandal susan rice's comments after the attack on the u.s. consulate in libya. her comments that the attack was though
a possible review of the military drone strategy. "washington journal" is next. host: good morning. welcome to "washington journal." congress returns to washington with the clock counting down on time left to tackle the tough fiscal cliff and make decisions about taxes, spending, and budget cuts. states are looking at how they can be affected. a question for you this morning, whether states should have a say in budget talks. here are the numbers to call. if you can also find us online. here is the headline in "the new york times." the pew center has a new study out called "the impact on the fiscal cliff on states." here is what it says. we would do more into these and how they will specifically affect states on an individual basis. there is a question on whether the fiscal cliff would hurt. it says -- our question for you this morning is whether the states should have a stake of in negotiations. looking more in the story "the new york times." it says -- some of the benefits states could receive, nobody is retained that president obama and republicans in congress will fail to reach
. >> the capital christmas tree will be on the road for a week before it gets to washington. >>> and ahead in sports the redskins marred their 80th anniversary celebration with a poor performance against a one win team. we'll be right back. >>> bundle up, we have temperatures down in the 30s and some low 40s out there. another chilly morning. looks like a diesel sent day though, sunshine here, not going to be a warm day. 4 by 3:00, potentially a high of maybe 51, 52, sunset just after 5:00. gets dark early now that we are on standard time. i'll be back in a few minutes, here's monika with timesaver traffic. >>> on the beltway toward university boulevard, construction is still in place in the two left lanes. traffic is moving at the speed limit so scoot over to the right to get around it. i'll have more in my next report. mike back to you. >>> a week ago today there was just a chance sandy would end up hitting us the hardest. >> instead the storm unleashed most of its power on new jersey and new york. many new york marathon runners stuck around to help after the cancellation. many wore oran
the federal deficit in half, instead he doubled it. >> rose: joining me from washington, d.c. is albert hunt of bloomberg news and john harris of politico. from des moines, iowa, john mile man. in new york, mark hall prin, cokie roberts and mat dowd of abc news and bloomberg news. i'm pleased they have them back on this program. we go to washington and albert hunt. where are we? >> charlie, i think that the fat lady is started to sing. it looks like thingsre moving in a very, very slow but steady direction in barack obama's favor both in the popular vote and the electoral vote. i base that on the polls, to be sure. also talking to both sides today i think's clearly more confidence in the obama camp. i think this is one of those great elections. there are very few of them, 2004 and 2000 were two where you aren't certain who is going to win but certainly all signs are pointing to a small obama victory tomorrow. >> rose: john harris? >> i agree with that if you look at these numbers and you look at the electoral college landscape and through any conventional prism what al said is completely tru
about the choices ahead. from washington d.c., tom friedman. he's a columnist for the "new york times" and coauthor of that used to be us, how america fell beyond the world we invented and how we can come back. david bureaucrats the author of social love and achievement. joining me is tom brokaw, special correspondent for nbc news and author of the times of our lives, a conversation about america. and jon meacham executive editor of random house and author of the fourth coming book, thomas jefferson e art of power. finally amy gutmann president of the university of pennsylvania and chair of the bioethics and quo author of the spirit of promise why campaigning under mines it. i am pleased to have each here for this information. what is it that this new president has to understand about america at this moment? >> well, i think that this new president is going to have to govern, and governing in a polarized society which we have and a society whic has tremendous problem, budgetary economic, immigration, educational. the list goes on. governing is going to mean bipartisan deals. and so ma
could come this evening. maine is the first state to put it on the ballot. maryland and washington voters are -- asked to overturn it done by legislators. minnesota voters asked to change the constitution to define it as between a man and woman. six states have legalized it by legislation or court order. this is maryland earlier this year. 32 states have previously rejected gay marriage, proponents say they have been encouraged by national polling. 49% favor same sex marriage. maryland's turn out reported as very heavy. early returns just into the newsroom, 52% are approving same sex marriage. in maine, 53% approving it. minnesota no returns yet. the results in washington may not be known until the end of the week because of late mail in ballots. reporting live. >> now in addition to election results, reporters watching voter turn out, analysts have predict that fewer people will go to the polls this year compared to the last president alley election and david stevenson is in san francisco tonight to tell us what he is finding out about the question of turn out. >> reporter: the v
of people who have written and thought hard about the choices ahead. from washington, d.c., tom friedman, he is a columnist in for the times and cocoauthor of "that used to be us, how america fell behind in the world it e invented" and david brooks of the "new york times," he is the author of "the social animal." joining me in new york, tom brokaw, a special correspondent for nbc news and the author of "the time of our lives" a conversation about america. and jon meacham, the executive editor of random house and the author of the forthcoming book "thomas jefferson, the art of power." finally joining us, amy gutman, president of the university of pennsylvania and chair of the president's commission on bioethics and the coauthor of "the spirit of compromise" why governing demands it and campaigning undermines it. i'm pleased to have each of them here for this conversation. we obviously don't know who the new president is and we come forward with the premise that whoever it is, these are the issues and the choices and the challenges that face him. i'll start with you. what is it this new presid
washington come together to solve a looming crisis? and, more misery for a region that's still reeling from sandy. >> everything is vulnerable. the coast line is vulnerable. trees are vulnerable. people are vulnerable. homes are vulnerable. >> shepard: another storm takes aim at people still recovering from sandy. >> this is it. i'm getting -- walking around -- >> shepard: tonight, tracking the nor'easter. >> shepard: plus, history at the ballot box. voters approve same sex marriage and make it legal to smoke pot just for fun. but one governor says don't break out the munchies just yet. first from fox this wednesday night, we'll get to the politics news but first the are in easter that's happening right now and slamming some of the areas that the super storm sandy disseminated just days ago. it's already knocked out power to tens of thousands more people. the powerful storm hitting parts of new york, new jersey, and pennsylvania. here in the big city, the long island railroad that carries millions of commuters is now shut down. overcrowding has forced officials to close down penn station. t
, as voters legalized same-sex marriage in maine and maryland, upholding same-sex marri washington state and defeating a measure to ban same-sex marriage in minnesota. in addition to same-sex marriage, maryland voters also affirmed the dream act, allowing undocumented immigrants to receive in-state tuition. in florida, voters defeated a measure that called for amending the state constitution to restrict abortion rights and bar public funds from funding abortions. in california, voters defeated ballot measures to repeal the death penalty and another that would have required labeling of genetically modified foods. a separate measure to ease penalties for nonviolent offenses under california's three strikes law was approved. california voters rejected measure that would have curbed the political influence of unions. in montana, voters overwhelmingly approved a measure that would limit corporate spending on elections while colorado voters also resoundingly approved a measure @acking a constitutional amendment that would call for the same. in a historic vote, voters in colorado and washington
-sex marriage while washington state is still counting the vote. in minnesota, a vote to ban same-sex marriage was shot down by voters. in maryland, prince george's is on its way to a new casino. the amendment passed, which will bring table games to maryland's existing casinos as well. it will help keep money inside the state rather than lose it to casinos in other states. >>> election day dragged into election night for hundreds of northern virginia voters. viewers in prince william county say they waited in line for more than four hours to vote at potomac middle school in dumfries. election workers say they had a much higher voter turnout than expected. excessively long lines were reported elsewhere in virginia too. workers blamed it on a shortage of voting machines. >>> vincent orange easily won re-election in city council. but newcomer independent david grosso beat out incumbent michael brown. phil mendelson is chairman of the council after serving for five months following kwame brown's resignation. yvette alexander retained her council ward seat. 88% of the vote for marion barry, who beg
will be successful in guiding our nation. >> paul ryan will return to washington, not as the next vice-president. but he did win re-election to the congressional seat he has held since 1998. >> the g.o.p. will remain in control of the house of representatives, the democrats failing to gets close to the 218 seats needed for a majority. the house speaker john boehner, obviously very pleased to retain his leadership role. >> for two years, our house majority has been the primary line of defense for the american people against a government that spends too much, taxes too much, certainly borrows too much, when it's left unchecked. and in the face of a staggering national debt that threatens our children's future, our majority passed a budget that begins to solve the problems. now, while others chose inaction in the face of this threat, we offered solutions. and the american people want solutions. and tonight, they have responded by renewing our house republican majority. >> the republicans will now have 221 seats, the 164 for the democrats. one wonders whether the leader the democratic part
in maryland, maine, and washington state will decide if they should make same-sex marriage legal. in minnesota, a gay marriage ban is on the ballot. >> reporter: this could be a historic night if maine, maryland, or washington voters approve, it would be the nation's first legalization of same-sex marriage by popular vote. maine is the first state to put the issue before voters on its own. maryland and washington voters asked to overturn legalization done by legislators and minnesota voters asked to change the state's constitution to define marriage as between a man and a woman. six states have legalized same- sex marriage by legislation or court order. this is maryland earlier this year. 32 states have previously rejected gay marriage. opponents are encouraged by national polling showing a significant plurality of americans. 49% favor same-sex marriage. the voter turn out is reported to be very heavy. the results in the washington state voting may not be known until the end of the week because of late mail-in ballots. >>> we have new numbers. the election results out of kentucky, the ap has j
outside her brother's home in washington, d.c. that was last night. her affair with david petraeus forced him to resign as head of the cia. >>> and finally, one of the stars in the aftermath of superstorm sandy has been new jersey's governor chris christie. it seems he's been everywhere including "saturday night live" where they talked about that fleece. >> i'd also like to give a special thanks to my wife pat who is here tonight who put up with a husband who smells like a wet fleece for the past three weeks. >> you have been wearing that fleece a lot. >> oh, yeah, it's basically fused to my skin a lot. >> but i have seen you wearing suits. >> oh, yeah, but i wear them over this fleece. i'm going to die in this fleece. >> you know, he actually has a pretty good sense of humor. i ran into him in the green room. i said, did anyone ever tell you look like the governor of new jersey, and he said, without missing a beat, unfortunately, yes. >> nice sense of humor there. >> indeed, thanks, ron, appreciate it. >>> this morning, president obama made a stray comment overseas that speaks volumes ta
and washington may have refused to arm these rebels. but armed they are like never before. >> suarez: and margaret warner takes the story from there. >> warner: for more on today's developments and what they mean for syria's president bashar al assad, i'm joined by andrew tabler, a senior fellow at the washington institute for near east policy. he was in rebel-held syrian border regions in mid-november. andrew, welcome back. >> thank you. >> warner: first of all, how critical is the rebel seizure of some of these surface-to-air missile from the captured army bases? >> they're answer cloutly vital. for months the syrian army has harassed rebel held territories and they've bombed them into submission. with these shoulder-fired missiles they're able to down syrian aircraft of all types and it allows the syrian opposition to have the possibility of actually saying they have a pure liberated territory which is completely outside of the regime's control and that sets the stage for a possible benghazi-like pocket that could push president assad south and west war war so step back from all t
've seen this time and again in washington and elsewhere. you know, these investigations take on a life of their own, they become exercises in self-justification and you don't want to -- it's very hard on a human level to say, oh, well, forget because people get invested in this. who was the responsible -- there was some moment where that decision either was made, which seems unclear to me, and then this leaks anyway. or it wasn't. and so -- where was that? and when it involves these people do you not go to the attorney general? >> and, by the way, i want to know when -- was the attorney general brought? in why did the attorney general know? when did the attorney general know it? is the fbi really conducting investigation of the cia director without the attorney general knowing that the fbi's conducting -- >> and the white house counsel. how could the white house counsel. >> the white house counsel has to know. and let me tell you something, i'm not going to say how i know this, but let me tell you something, there are some people high up in official washington that knew about this. i k
that happen in washington but, first, let's look at how the president made his victory happen. the president put together a decisive electoral college victory winning at least 303 votes to romney's 206 and at this hour in florida where the president leads by it looks like at this moment 50,000 votes, remains too close to call where we think the vote remains should favor the president. those folks in miami-dade are going to start counting votes when they get to work this morning. but those margin of victory was smaller than in 2008. in the end demographics and a strong turnout operation delivered the president a win in the popular vote, two points. democrats held on to control of the u.s. senate and though democrats had 23 seats to defend the caucus could still actually pick up members for the president's second term, get up to 54 seats perhaps. two senate races do remace too close to call. jon tester narrowly leads danny rehberg. also too close to call we have the house race in the 18th district where allen west is now trailing with 100% in. patrick murphy there. west may be knocked off afte
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 333 (some duplicates have been removed)

Terms of Use (10 Mar 2001)